To Be Young, Gifted & Black: Remembering Michael K. Williams

Sep 8, 2021 | BM4F Spotlights, Uncategorized | 0 comments

When you feelin’ really low
Yeah, there’s a great truth that you should know
When you’re young, gifted and black
Your soul’s intact

Nina Simone, Young, Gifted and Black

How to be young, gifted and black?

This Sunday, September 6, 2021 we lost a Young, Gifted and Black King. Our good brother Michael K. Williams transitioned to an ancestor way too young and way too soon. To be Young, Gifted and Black feels immortal until we, Black People, remember how much white supremacy threatens our mere existence. Michael K. Williams was a friend to Black Millennials 4 Flint. We had a DOPE opportunity back in October 2018 to be featured in a BET Docuseries Finding Justice: The Baltimore Lead Paint Crisis which aired in April 2019. While viewers just saw a snippet of that moment, it was behind the scenes where we saw the pain in Michael’s eyes as we ventured throughout the city to support Baltimore residents with information about their tenant’s rights to sue slumlords who refuse to uphold the appropriate safe, lead free housing requirements. The mixture of both sadness and sheer rage Michael K. Williams felt on that autumn day mirrors his passion beyond his theatrical gift–the liberation of Black people. Because of Michael K. Williams, our reach as an organization soared. He allowed a group of young, gifted and Black radicals borrow his immense platform to educate the nation on the ills of environmental racism.

Michael K. Williams’ legacy will live on through the many lives he’s touched and we are incredibly honored and thankful to have worked with him and to witness his light.

Michelle Mabson

Michael K. Williams was a tireless advocate for communities like Baltimore and Brooklyn. As an activist, Williams worked closely with youth and those caught in the criminal justice system. During his time collaborating with BM4F, he was a genuine light to everyone around him, willing to go door to door and talk to people on the streets of Baltimore about the impacts of lead paint and housing. He showed great concern, especially for the young children living in homes that had elevated lead levels and as he so beautifully said, he was in the community because “[he] wanted to give [his] energy to to things to create solutions.” Indeed, he served as a spokesperson – someone folks in the community could relate to and listen to when he spoke about the grave injustice of lead poisoning and the evidence that it has been linked to juvenile delinquency. Michael K. Williams’ legacy will live on through the many lives he’s touched and we are incredibly honored and thankful to have worked with him and to witness his light.

We must begin to tell our young…There’s a world waiting for you

Michael K. Williams was a tireless advocate for communities like Baltimore and Brooklyn. AS an activist, Williams worked closely with youth and those caught in the criminal justice system. During his time collaborating with BM4F, he was a genuine light to everyone around him, willing to go door to door and talk to people on the streets of Baltimore about the impacts of lead paint and housing. He showed great concern, especially for the young children living in homes that had elevated lead levels and as he so beautifully said, he was in the community because “[he] wanted to give [his] energy to to things to create solutions.” Indeed, he served as a spokesperson – someone folks in the community could relate to and listen to when he spoke about the grave injustice of lead poisoning and the evidence that it has been linked to juvenile delinquency. Michael K. Williams’ legacy will live on through the many lives he’s touched and we are incredibly honored and thankful to have worked with him and to witness his light. about the grave injustice of lead poisoning and the evidence that it has been linked to juvenile delinquency. Michael K. Williams’ legacy will live on through the many lives he’s touched and we are incredibly honored and thankful to have worked with him and to witness his light.

He allowed a group of young, gifted and Black radicals borrow his immense platform to educate the nation on the ills of environmental racism.

LaTricea D. Adams

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